Make Your Own Screw Shoes For Under $5

Wayne Screwing My Shoes

Wayne The Handyman Hard at Work to Make His Running Wife Happy

Marathon Mama’s Step by Step Guide for Making Your Own Pair of Screw Shoes:

Step 1: Select a pair of running shoes you’d like to pimp out with grabbing power for those icy runs!

I prefer to use a pair that I’ve worn for some time but that still have enough cushion and wear to last a couple hundred more miles or so.   When making your decision, it’s good to consider what size of sheet metal screws you will be using, since a very thin sole would not work well with say a 3/8th inch hexagonal screw since it would likely push through the outer sole and into the insole (where your foot will be.)

I had hoped to use my Brooks Pure Grit 1s but the 3/8 inch screws we had purchased were too long to make it a safe option.

I had hoped to use my Brooks Pure Grit 1s but the 3/8 inch screws we had purchased were too long to make it a safe option.

I opted for my Brooks Cascadia 6 shoes for this winter’s version of screw shoes.  The soles are thicker, which made them a better match for the size of sheet metal screws we had on hand.

Step 2: Gather Your Tools

*You will need to buy a package of hexagonal sheet metal screws, which can be purchased at any hardware store for under $5 for a pack of 100.

*Power Drill (optional) – Wayne has done it both with drilling holes into the shoes and without first drilling. If you don’t have access to a drill or don’t want to use one, no worries.

*Hex Screw Driver (not optional) – This was the tool that did the bulk of the work to get the screws into the bottoms of the shoes.

Sheet Metal Screws

Sheet Metal Screws

 

Hex Screw Driver

Hex Screw Driver

Step 3: Screw Your Shoes

Place one of the shoes between your knees securely with the sole facing you and use the hex screw driver with one of the sheet metal screws and begin turning it while you apply steady pressure into the shoe. It took me a couple of tries to get the hang of it, but I was able to handle it myself after that.  I would recommend no fewer than 10 screws per shoe and no more than 16. It’s really up to you and your preferences and it’s not hard to remove a few if you find the tread too uncomfortable once you finish up and test them out.  I like to make sure to put a few along the top, a few in the middle and some at the heel for grip no matter where your foot tends to strike.  Here’s an important point: Place the screws into the lugs (raised surfaces) along the bottom of the shoe, since there’s more sole there to drill into.

Apply steady pressure as you twist the hex screwdriver.

Apply steady pressure as you twist the hex screwdriver.

Keep working until the screw is entirely embedded in the sole of your running shoe.

Keep working until the screw is entirely embedded in the sole of your running shoe.

 

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Step 4: Test Them Out

Always be cautious when running on packed snow and ice, but I do promise that you’ll soon realize that you are much safer with a pair of these babies than you were without as you take to the roads and trails with your studded shoes.  Now get back to that winter training!

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